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Research at St Andrews

Trust and privacy in distributed work groups

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Author(s)

Denise Anthony, Tristan Nicholas Hoang Henderson, James Kitts

School/Research organisations

Abstract

Trust plays an important role in both group cooperation and economic exchange. As new technologies emerge for communication and exchange, established mechanisms of trust are disrupted or distorted, which can lead to the breakdown of cooperation or to increasing fraud in exchange. This paper examines whether and how personal privacy information about members of distributed work groups influences individuals' cooperation and privacy behavior in the group. Specifically, we examine whether people use others' privacy settings as signals of trustworthiness that affect group cooperation. In addition, we examine how individual privacy preferences relate to trustworthy behavior. Understanding how people interact with others in online settings, in particular when they have limited information, has important implications for geographically distributed groups enabled through new information technologies. In addition, understanding how people might use information gleaned from technology usage, such as personal privacy settings, particularly in the absence of other information, has implications for understanding many potential situations that arise in pervasively networked environments.

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Details

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationSocial Computing and Behavioral Modeling
EditorsHuan Liu, John J. Salerno, Michael J. Young
Place of PublicationNew York
PublisherSpringer
Pages16-23
ISBN (Electronic)978-1-4419-0056-2
ISBN (Print)978-1-4419-0055-5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2009
EventSecond International Workshop on Social Computing, Behavioral Modeling, and Prediction - Phoenix, Arizona, United States
Duration: 31 Mar 20091 Apr 2009

Conference

ConferenceSecond International Workshop on Social Computing, Behavioral Modeling, and Prediction
CountryUnited States
CityPhoenix, Arizona
Period31/03/091/04/09

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ID: 6055544

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