Skip to content

Research at St Andrews

Turn alternation and the influence of environmental factors on search routes through branched structures by ladybirds (Coccinella septempunctata and Adalia bipunctata)

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Author(s)

Rosalind K. Humphreys, Markus Neuhäuser, Graeme D. Ruxton

School/Research organisations

Abstract

Turn alternation is a locomotory behaviour wherein an animal makes consecutive turns in opposite directions (left-then-right or right-then-left). It has been suggested that its adaptive function is to maintain locomotion in a relatively constant general direction while negotiating obstacles. Previous work has focussed on the use of turn alternation in prey species in artificial horizontal mazes. In the first study presented here, we tested whether predatory seven-spot ladybirds (Coccinella septempunctata) exhibit turn alternation when repeatedly presented with consecutive choice turning decisions on vertically oriented twigs. Our findings suggest that turn alternation occurs vertically as well as horizontally, on plant structures as well as terrestrially, and in a type of animal (predatory insect) in which turn alternation has received little attention. In the second study presented here, we tested whether characteristics of branched structures explored by two-spot ladybirds (Adalia bipunctata) influence turning decisions. Our findings suggest that ladybirds exhibit preferences for thicker over thinner, straighter over more deviating headings, and higher over lower turning choice options at bifurcations. These exploratory studies indicate that while turn alternation is an observable phenomenon in ladybirds, it is not the only predictor of searching behaviour on branched structures.
Close

Details

Original languageEnglish
Article number104292
JournalBehavioural Processes
VolumeIn-Press
Early online date5 Dec 2020
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 5 Dec 2020

    Research areas

  • Consecutive choice, Decision-making, Environmental variables, Foraging efficiency, Search strategy, Turn repetition

Discover related content
Find related publications, people, projects and more using interactive charts.

View graph of relations

Related by author

  1. Drop when the stakes are high: adaptive, flexible use of dropping behaviour by aphids

    Humphreys, R. K., Ruxton, G. D. & Karley, A. J., 30 Mar 2021, In: Behaviour. Advance Articles, p. 1-21 21 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

  2. Size-dependent predation risk in cryptic prey

    Pembury Smith, M. Q. R. & Ruxton, G. D., 7 Feb 2021, In: Journal of Ethology.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

  3. How fast is a snail’s pace? The influences of size and substrate on gastropod speed of locomotion

    Pembury Smith, M. Q. R. & Ruxton, G. D., 2 Feb 2021, In: Journal of Zoology. Early View

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

  4. Evaluation of disruptive camouflage of avian cup-nests

    Mulder, T., Campbell, C. & Ruxton, G. D., Jan 2021, In: Ibis. 163, 1, p. 150-158

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

  5. Effective use of the McNemar test

    Pembury Smith, M. & Ruxton, G. D., 10 Oct 2020, In: Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology. 74, 9 p., 133.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Related by journal

  1. Behavioural Processes (Journal)

    Andy Gardner (Reviewer)

    2020

    Activity: Publication peer-review and editorial work typesPeer review of manuscripts

  2. Behavioural Processes (Journal)

    Susan Denise Healy (Editor)

    1 Sep 201431 Dec 2014

    Activity: Publication peer-review and editorial work typesEditor of research journal

  3. Behavioural Processes (Journal)

    Susan Denise Healy (Member of editorial board)

    2010 → …

    Activity: Publication peer-review and editorial work typesEditor of research journal

Related by journal

  1. The rationality of decisions depends on behavioural context

    Glaser, G. L., Miller, M. C., Healy, S. D. & Shuker, D. M., 5 Dec 2020, In: Behavioural Processes. In-press, 104293.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

  2. The relationship between food calling and agonistic behaviour in wild chimpanzees

    Ischer, G., Zuberbühler, K. & Fedurek, P., Sep 2020, In: Behavioural Processes. 178, 104182.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

  3. Signalling interactions during ontogeny are a cause of social plasticity in Enchenopa treehoppers (Hemiptera: Membracidae)

    Desjonquères, C., Speck, B. & Rodríguez, R. L., Sep 2019, In: Behavioural Processes. 166, 9 p., 103887.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

  4. Social learning of arbitrary food preferences in bonobos

    Shorland, G., Genty, E., Guéry, J-P. & Zuberbuhler, K., Oct 2019, In: Behavioural Processes. 167, 103912.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

ID: 271680471

Top