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Twelve- and 18-month-olds copy actions in terms of goals

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Twelve- and 18-month-olds copy actions in terms of goals. / Carpenter, Malinda; Call, Josep; Tomasello, Michael.

In: Developmental Science, Vol. 8, No. 1, 01.2005, p. F13-F20.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Harvard

Carpenter, M, Call, J & Tomasello, M 2005, 'Twelve- and 18-month-olds copy actions in terms of goals', Developmental Science, vol. 8, no. 1, pp. F13-F20. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-7687.2004.00385.x

APA

Carpenter, M., Call, J., & Tomasello, M. (2005). Twelve- and 18-month-olds copy actions in terms of goals. Developmental Science, 8(1), F13-F20. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-7687.2004.00385.x

Vancouver

Carpenter M, Call J, Tomasello M. Twelve- and 18-month-olds copy actions in terms of goals. Developmental Science. 2005 Jan;8(1):F13-F20. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-7687.2004.00385.x

Author

Carpenter, Malinda ; Call, Josep ; Tomasello, Michael. / Twelve- and 18-month-olds copy actions in terms of goals. In: Developmental Science. 2005 ; Vol. 8, No. 1. pp. F13-F20.

Bibtex - Download

@article{c44af0a904a547b49a3c6d81f5498530,
title = "Twelve- and 18-month-olds copy actions in terms of goals",
abstract = "In the context of an imitation game, 12- and 18-month-old infants saw an adult do such things as make a toy mouse hop across a mat (with sound effects). In one condition (House), the adult ended by placing the mouse in a toy house, whereas in another condition (No House) there was no house present at the final location. Infants at both ages usually simply put the mouse in the house (ignoring the hopping motion and sound effects) in the House condition, presumably because they interpreted the adult's action in terms of this final goal and so ignored the behavioral means. In contrast, infants copied the adult's action (both the hopping motion and the sound effects) when no house was present, presumably because here infants saw the action itself as the adult's only goal. From very early, infants' social learning is flexible: infants focus on and copy either the end or the means of an adult action as required by the context.",
keywords = "Child Development, Female, Goals, Humans, Infant, Learning, Male, Movement, Social Behavior, Verbal Behavior",
author = "Malinda Carpenter and Josep Call and Michael Tomasello",
year = "2005",
month = jan,
doi = "10.1111/j.1467-7687.2004.00385.x",
language = "English",
volume = "8",
pages = "F13--F20",
journal = "Developmental Science",
issn = "1363-755X",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "1",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Twelve- and 18-month-olds copy actions in terms of goals

AU - Carpenter, Malinda

AU - Call, Josep

AU - Tomasello, Michael

PY - 2005/1

Y1 - 2005/1

N2 - In the context of an imitation game, 12- and 18-month-old infants saw an adult do such things as make a toy mouse hop across a mat (with sound effects). In one condition (House), the adult ended by placing the mouse in a toy house, whereas in another condition (No House) there was no house present at the final location. Infants at both ages usually simply put the mouse in the house (ignoring the hopping motion and sound effects) in the House condition, presumably because they interpreted the adult's action in terms of this final goal and so ignored the behavioral means. In contrast, infants copied the adult's action (both the hopping motion and the sound effects) when no house was present, presumably because here infants saw the action itself as the adult's only goal. From very early, infants' social learning is flexible: infants focus on and copy either the end or the means of an adult action as required by the context.

AB - In the context of an imitation game, 12- and 18-month-old infants saw an adult do such things as make a toy mouse hop across a mat (with sound effects). In one condition (House), the adult ended by placing the mouse in a toy house, whereas in another condition (No House) there was no house present at the final location. Infants at both ages usually simply put the mouse in the house (ignoring the hopping motion and sound effects) in the House condition, presumably because they interpreted the adult's action in terms of this final goal and so ignored the behavioral means. In contrast, infants copied the adult's action (both the hopping motion and the sound effects) when no house was present, presumably because here infants saw the action itself as the adult's only goal. From very early, infants' social learning is flexible: infants focus on and copy either the end or the means of an adult action as required by the context.

KW - Child Development

KW - Female

KW - Goals

KW - Humans

KW - Infant

KW - Learning

KW - Male

KW - Movement

KW - Social Behavior

KW - Verbal Behavior

U2 - 10.1111/j.1467-7687.2004.00385.x

DO - 10.1111/j.1467-7687.2004.00385.x

M3 - Article

C2 - 15647059

VL - 8

SP - F13-F20

JO - Developmental Science

JF - Developmental Science

SN - 1363-755X

IS - 1

ER -

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