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Unwilling versus unable: infants' understanding of intentional action

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Unwilling versus unable : infants' understanding of intentional action. / Behne, Tanya; Carpenter, Malinda; Call, Josep; Tomasello, Michael.

In: Developmental Psychology, Vol. 41, No. 2, 03.2005, p. 328-337.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Harvard

Behne, T, Carpenter, M, Call, J & Tomasello, M 2005, 'Unwilling versus unable: infants' understanding of intentional action', Developmental Psychology, vol. 41, no. 2, pp. 328-337. https://doi.org/10.1037/0012-1649.41.2.328

APA

Behne, T., Carpenter, M., Call, J., & Tomasello, M. (2005). Unwilling versus unable: infants' understanding of intentional action. Developmental Psychology, 41(2), 328-337. https://doi.org/10.1037/0012-1649.41.2.328

Vancouver

Behne T, Carpenter M, Call J, Tomasello M. Unwilling versus unable: infants' understanding of intentional action. Developmental Psychology. 2005 Mar;41(2):328-337. https://doi.org/10.1037/0012-1649.41.2.328

Author

Behne, Tanya ; Carpenter, Malinda ; Call, Josep ; Tomasello, Michael. / Unwilling versus unable : infants' understanding of intentional action. In: Developmental Psychology. 2005 ; Vol. 41, No. 2. pp. 328-337.

Bibtex - Download

@article{ca85e71c590a48a19d7f1bfa254849eb,
title = "Unwilling versus unable: infants' understanding of intentional action",
abstract = "Infants experienced a female adult handing them toys. Sometimes, however, the transaction failed, either because the adult was in various ways unwilling to give the toy (e.g., she teased the child with it or played with it herself) or else because she was unable to give it (e.g., she accidentally dropped it). Infants at 9, 12, and 18 months of age reacted with more impatience (e.g., reaching, looking away) when the adult was unwilling to give them the toy than when she was simply unable to give it. Six-month-olds, in contrast, showed no evidence of this differentiation. Because infants' behavioral responses were appropriately adapted to different kinds of intentional actions, and because the adult's actions sometimes produced results that did not match her goal (when having accidents or failed attempts), these findings provide especially rich evidence that infants first begin to understand goal-directed action at around 9 months of age.",
keywords = "Aptitude, Attitude, Child Development, Cognition, Female, Humans, Infant, Intention, Male, Volition",
author = "Tanya Behne and Malinda Carpenter and Josep Call and Michael Tomasello",
year = "2005",
month = mar,
doi = "10.1037/0012-1649.41.2.328",
language = "English",
volume = "41",
pages = "328--337",
journal = "Developmental Psychology",
issn = "0012-1649",
publisher = "American Psychological Association Inc.",
number = "2",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Unwilling versus unable

T2 - infants' understanding of intentional action

AU - Behne, Tanya

AU - Carpenter, Malinda

AU - Call, Josep

AU - Tomasello, Michael

PY - 2005/3

Y1 - 2005/3

N2 - Infants experienced a female adult handing them toys. Sometimes, however, the transaction failed, either because the adult was in various ways unwilling to give the toy (e.g., she teased the child with it or played with it herself) or else because she was unable to give it (e.g., she accidentally dropped it). Infants at 9, 12, and 18 months of age reacted with more impatience (e.g., reaching, looking away) when the adult was unwilling to give them the toy than when she was simply unable to give it. Six-month-olds, in contrast, showed no evidence of this differentiation. Because infants' behavioral responses were appropriately adapted to different kinds of intentional actions, and because the adult's actions sometimes produced results that did not match her goal (when having accidents or failed attempts), these findings provide especially rich evidence that infants first begin to understand goal-directed action at around 9 months of age.

AB - Infants experienced a female adult handing them toys. Sometimes, however, the transaction failed, either because the adult was in various ways unwilling to give the toy (e.g., she teased the child with it or played with it herself) or else because she was unable to give it (e.g., she accidentally dropped it). Infants at 9, 12, and 18 months of age reacted with more impatience (e.g., reaching, looking away) when the adult was unwilling to give them the toy than when she was simply unable to give it. Six-month-olds, in contrast, showed no evidence of this differentiation. Because infants' behavioral responses were appropriately adapted to different kinds of intentional actions, and because the adult's actions sometimes produced results that did not match her goal (when having accidents or failed attempts), these findings provide especially rich evidence that infants first begin to understand goal-directed action at around 9 months of age.

KW - Aptitude

KW - Attitude

KW - Child Development

KW - Cognition

KW - Female

KW - Humans

KW - Infant

KW - Intention

KW - Male

KW - Volition

U2 - 10.1037/0012-1649.41.2.328

DO - 10.1037/0012-1649.41.2.328

M3 - Article

C2 - 15769189

VL - 41

SP - 328

EP - 337

JO - Developmental Psychology

JF - Developmental Psychology

SN - 0012-1649

IS - 2

ER -

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ID: 78736641

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