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Valid Facial Cues to Cooperation and Trust: Male Facial Width and Trustworthiness

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

DOI

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Valid Facial Cues to Cooperation and Trust : Male Facial Width and Trustworthiness. / Stirrat, Michael Robert; Perrett, David Ian.

In: Psychological Science, Vol. 21, No. 3, 03.2010, p. 349-354.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Stirrat, MR & Perrett, DI 2010, 'Valid Facial Cues to Cooperation and Trust: Male Facial Width and Trustworthiness' Psychological Science, vol 21, no. 3, pp. 349-354. DOI: 10.1177/0956797610362647

APA

Stirrat, M. R., & Perrett, D. I. (2010). Valid Facial Cues to Cooperation and Trust: Male Facial Width and Trustworthiness. Psychological Science, 21(3), 349-354. DOI: 10.1177/0956797610362647

Vancouver

Stirrat MR, Perrett DI. Valid Facial Cues to Cooperation and Trust: Male Facial Width and Trustworthiness. Psychological Science. 2010 Mar;21(3):349-354. Available from, DOI: 10.1177/0956797610362647

Author

Stirrat, Michael Robert; Perrett, David Ian / Valid Facial Cues to Cooperation and Trust : Male Facial Width and Trustworthiness.

In: Psychological Science, Vol. 21, No. 3, 03.2010, p. 349-354.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bibtex - Download

@article{61773d1df5924bb9ab4796c7fa6565bb,
title = "Valid Facial Cues to Cooperation and Trust: Male Facial Width and Trustworthiness",
abstract = "Decisions about whom to trust are biased by stable facial traits such as attractiveness, similarity to kin, and perceived trustworthiness. Research addressing the validity of facial trustworthiness or its basis in facial features is scarce, and the results have been inconsistent. We measured male trustworthiness operationally in trust games in which participants had options to collaborate for mutual financial gain or to exploit for greater personal gain. We also measured facial (bizygomatic) width (scaled for face height) because this is a sexually dimorphic, testosterone-linked trait predictive of male aggression. We found that men with greater facial width were more likely to exploit the trust of others and that other players were less likely to trust male counterparts with wide rather than narrow faces (independent of their attractiveness). Moreover, manipulating this facial-width ratio with computer graphics controlled attributions of trustworthiness, particularly for subordinate female evaluators.",
author = "Stirrat, {Michael Robert} and Perrett, {David Ian}",
year = "2010",
month = "3",
doi = "10.1177/0956797610362647",
volume = "21",
pages = "349--354",
journal = "Psychological Science",
issn = "0956-7976",
publisher = "Sage",
number = "3",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Valid Facial Cues to Cooperation and Trust

T2 - Psychological Science

AU - Stirrat,Michael Robert

AU - Perrett,David Ian

PY - 2010/3

Y1 - 2010/3

N2 - Decisions about whom to trust are biased by stable facial traits such as attractiveness, similarity to kin, and perceived trustworthiness. Research addressing the validity of facial trustworthiness or its basis in facial features is scarce, and the results have been inconsistent. We measured male trustworthiness operationally in trust games in which participants had options to collaborate for mutual financial gain or to exploit for greater personal gain. We also measured facial (bizygomatic) width (scaled for face height) because this is a sexually dimorphic, testosterone-linked trait predictive of male aggression. We found that men with greater facial width were more likely to exploit the trust of others and that other players were less likely to trust male counterparts with wide rather than narrow faces (independent of their attractiveness). Moreover, manipulating this facial-width ratio with computer graphics controlled attributions of trustworthiness, particularly for subordinate female evaluators.

AB - Decisions about whom to trust are biased by stable facial traits such as attractiveness, similarity to kin, and perceived trustworthiness. Research addressing the validity of facial trustworthiness or its basis in facial features is scarce, and the results have been inconsistent. We measured male trustworthiness operationally in trust games in which participants had options to collaborate for mutual financial gain or to exploit for greater personal gain. We also measured facial (bizygomatic) width (scaled for face height) because this is a sexually dimorphic, testosterone-linked trait predictive of male aggression. We found that men with greater facial width were more likely to exploit the trust of others and that other players were less likely to trust male counterparts with wide rather than narrow faces (independent of their attractiveness). Moreover, manipulating this facial-width ratio with computer graphics controlled attributions of trustworthiness, particularly for subordinate female evaluators.

U2 - 10.1177/0956797610362647

DO - 10.1177/0956797610362647

M3 - Article

VL - 21

SP - 349

EP - 354

JO - Psychological Science

JF - Psychological Science

SN - 0956-7976

IS - 3

ER -

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ID: 5335454