Skip to content

Research at St Andrews

Vision and visual history in elite/near-elite level cricketers and rugby-league players

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Author(s)

Brendan Barratt, Jonathan Flavell, Simon Bennett, Alice Cuickshank, Alex Manowski, Julie Harris, John Buckley

School/Research organisations

Abstract

Background: The importance of optimal and/or superior vision for participation in high-level sport remains the subject of considerable clinical research interest. Here we examine the vision and visual history of elite/near-elite cricketers and rugby-league players.Methods: Stereoacuity (TNO), colour vision, and distance (with/without pinhole) and near visual acuity (VA) were measured in two cricket squads (elite/international-level, female, n=16; near-elite, male, n=23) and one professional rugby-league squad (male, n=20). Refractive error was determined, and details of any correction worn and visual history were recorded.Results: Overall, 63% had their last eye-examination within 2 years. However, some had not had an eye examination for 5 years, or had never had one (near-elite-cricketers: 30%; rugby-league players: 15%; elite-cricketers: 6%). Comparing our results for all participants to published data for young, optimally-corrected, non-sporting adults, distance VA was ~1 line of letters worse than expected. Adopting α=0.01, the deficit in distance-VA deficit was significant, but only for elite-cricketers (p<0.001) (near-elite cricketers, p=0.02; rugby-league players, p=0.03). Near-VA did not differ between subgroups or relative to published norms for young adults (p>0.02 for all comparisons). On average, stereoacuity was better than in young adults, but only in elite-cricketers (p<0.001; p=0.03, near-elite-cricketers; p=0.47, rugby-league -players). On-field visual issues were present in 27% of participants, and mostly (in 75% of cases) comprised uncorrected ametropia. Some cricketers (near-elite: 17.4%; elite: 38%) wore refractive correction during play but no rugby-league player did. Some individuals with prescribed correction choose not to wear it when playing.Conclusion: Aside from near stereoacuity in elite-cricketers, these basic visual abilities were not better than equivalent, published data for optimally-corrected adults. 20-25% exhibited sub-optimal vision, suggesting that the clearest possible vision might not be critical for participation at the highest levels in the sports of cricket or rugby-league. Although vision could be improved in a sizeable proportion of our sample, the impact of correcting these, mostly subtle, refractive anomalies on playing performance is unknown.
Close

Details

Original languageEnglish
JournalSports Medicine - Open
Volume3
Issue number39
DOIs
StatePublished - 10 Nov 2017

    Research areas

  • Vision, Eye, Eyesight, Elite sports, Ametropia, refractive error, Cricket, Rugby league

Discover related content
Find related publications, people, projects and more using interactive charts.

View graph of relations

Related by author

  1. Temporal estimation in prediction motion tasks is biased by a moving destination

    Flavell, J. C., Barrett, B. T., Buckley, J. G., Harris, J. M., Scally, A. J., Beebe, N. B., Cruickshank, A. G. & Bennett, S. J. 14 Feb 2018 In : Journal of Vision. 18, 2, p. 1-11 11 p., 5

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  2. Is countershading camouflage robust to lighting change due to weather?

    Penacchio, O., Lovell, P. G. & Harris, J. M. 7 Feb 2018 In : Royal Society Open Science. 5, 170801

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  3. Development of the MapMe intervention body image scales of known weight status for 4-5 and 10-11 year old children

    Jones, A., Tovee, M., Cutler, L., Parkinson, K., Ells, L., Araujo-Soares, V., Pearce, M., Mann, K., Scott, D., Harris, J. & Adamson, A. 28 Nov 2017 In : Journal of Public Health. In press

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  4. Establishing the behavioural limits for countershaded camouflage

    Penacchio, O., Harris, J. & Lovell, P. G. 20 Oct 2017 In : Scientific Reports. 7, 13672

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  5. Perceived duration of brief visual events is mediated by timing mechanisms at the global stages of visual processing

    Beattie, L., Curran, W., Benton, C. P., Harris, J. M. & Hibbard, P. B. 1 Mar 2017 In : Royal Society Open Science. 4, 8 p., 160928

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

ID: 251494587