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Vocal Learning and Auditory-Vocal Feedback

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter (peer-reviewed)

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Vocal Learning and Auditory-Vocal Feedback. / Tyack, Peter Lloyd.

Vertebrate Sound Production and Acoustic Communication. ed. / Roderick A. Suthers; W. Tecumsah Fitch; Richard R Fay; Arthur N. Popper. Vol. 53 Heidelberg : Springer, 2016. p. 261-295 (Springer Handbook of Auditory Research; Vol. 53, No. Chapter 9).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter (peer-reviewed)

Harvard

Tyack, PL 2016, Vocal Learning and Auditory-Vocal Feedback. in RA Suthers, WT Fitch, RR Fay & AN Popper (eds), Vertebrate Sound Production and Acoustic Communication. vol. 53, Springer Handbook of Auditory Research, no. Chapter 9, vol. 53, Springer, Heidelberg, pp. 261-295. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-27721-9

APA

Tyack, P. L. (2016). Vocal Learning and Auditory-Vocal Feedback. In R. A. Suthers, W. T. Fitch, R. R. Fay, & A. N. Popper (Eds.), Vertebrate Sound Production and Acoustic Communication (Vol. 53, pp. 261-295). (Springer Handbook of Auditory Research; Vol. 53, No. Chapter 9). Heidelberg: Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-27721-9

Vancouver

Tyack PL. Vocal Learning and Auditory-Vocal Feedback. In Suthers RA, Fitch WT, Fay RR, Popper AN, editors, Vertebrate Sound Production and Acoustic Communication. Vol. 53. Heidelberg: Springer. 2016. p. 261-295. (Springer Handbook of Auditory Research; Chapter 9). https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-27721-9

Author

Tyack, Peter Lloyd. / Vocal Learning and Auditory-Vocal Feedback. Vertebrate Sound Production and Acoustic Communication. editor / Roderick A. Suthers ; W. Tecumsah Fitch ; Richard R Fay ; Arthur N. Popper. Vol. 53 Heidelberg : Springer, 2016. pp. 261-295 (Springer Handbook of Auditory Research; Chapter 9).

Bibtex - Download

@inbook{ffe59fe687bc44e383f729ea1b1ac18d,
title = "Vocal Learning and Auditory-Vocal Feedback",
abstract = "Vocal learning is usually studied in songbirds and humans, species thatcan form auditory templates by listening to acoustic models and then learnto vocalize to match the template. Most other species are thought to develop vocalizations without auditory feedback. However, auditory inputinfluences the acoustic structure of vocalizations in a broad distribution ofbirds and mammals. Vocalizations are dened here as sounds generatedby forcing air past vibrating membranes. A vocal motor program maygenerate vocalizations such as crying or laughter, but auditory feedbackmay be required for matching precise acoustic features of vocalizations.This chapter discriminates limited vocal learning, which uses auditory input to fine-tune acoustic features of an inherited auditory template, fromcomplex vocal learning, in which novel sounds are learned by matching alearned auditory template. Two or three songbird taxa and four or vemammalian taxa are known for complex vocal learning. A broader rangeof mammals converge in the acoustic structure of vocalizations when insocially interacting groups, which qualifies as limited vocal learning. Allbirds and mammals tested use auditory-vocal feedback to adjust theirvocalizations to compensate for the effects of noise, and many speciesmodulate their signals as the costs and benefits of communicating vary.This chapter asks whether some auditory-vocal feedback may have provided neural substrates for the evolution of vocal learning. Progress willrequire more precise definitions of different forms of vocal learning, broadcomparative review of their presence and absence, and behavioral andneurobiological investigations into the mechanisms underlying the skills.",
keywords = "Auditory-vocal feedback, Compensation for noise, Lombard effect, Vocal convergence, Vocal imitation, Vocal learning, Vocal mimicry, Vocal plasticity",
author = "Tyack, {Peter Lloyd}",
year = "2016",
doi = "10.1007/978-3-319-27721-9",
language = "English",
isbn = "978-3-319-27719-6",
volume = "53",
series = "Springer Handbook of Auditory Research",
publisher = "Springer",
number = "Chapter 9",
pages = "261--295",
editor = "Suthers, {Roderick A.} and Fitch, {W. Tecumsah} and Fay, {Richard R} and Popper, {Arthur N.}",
booktitle = "Vertebrate Sound Production and Acoustic Communication",
address = "Netherlands",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - CHAP

T1 - Vocal Learning and Auditory-Vocal Feedback

AU - Tyack, Peter Lloyd

PY - 2016

Y1 - 2016

N2 - Vocal learning is usually studied in songbirds and humans, species thatcan form auditory templates by listening to acoustic models and then learnto vocalize to match the template. Most other species are thought to develop vocalizations without auditory feedback. However, auditory inputinfluences the acoustic structure of vocalizations in a broad distribution ofbirds and mammals. Vocalizations are dened here as sounds generatedby forcing air past vibrating membranes. A vocal motor program maygenerate vocalizations such as crying or laughter, but auditory feedbackmay be required for matching precise acoustic features of vocalizations.This chapter discriminates limited vocal learning, which uses auditory input to fine-tune acoustic features of an inherited auditory template, fromcomplex vocal learning, in which novel sounds are learned by matching alearned auditory template. Two or three songbird taxa and four or vemammalian taxa are known for complex vocal learning. A broader rangeof mammals converge in the acoustic structure of vocalizations when insocially interacting groups, which qualifies as limited vocal learning. Allbirds and mammals tested use auditory-vocal feedback to adjust theirvocalizations to compensate for the effects of noise, and many speciesmodulate their signals as the costs and benefits of communicating vary.This chapter asks whether some auditory-vocal feedback may have provided neural substrates for the evolution of vocal learning. Progress willrequire more precise definitions of different forms of vocal learning, broadcomparative review of their presence and absence, and behavioral andneurobiological investigations into the mechanisms underlying the skills.

AB - Vocal learning is usually studied in songbirds and humans, species thatcan form auditory templates by listening to acoustic models and then learnto vocalize to match the template. Most other species are thought to develop vocalizations without auditory feedback. However, auditory inputinfluences the acoustic structure of vocalizations in a broad distribution ofbirds and mammals. Vocalizations are dened here as sounds generatedby forcing air past vibrating membranes. A vocal motor program maygenerate vocalizations such as crying or laughter, but auditory feedbackmay be required for matching precise acoustic features of vocalizations.This chapter discriminates limited vocal learning, which uses auditory input to fine-tune acoustic features of an inherited auditory template, fromcomplex vocal learning, in which novel sounds are learned by matching alearned auditory template. Two or three songbird taxa and four or vemammalian taxa are known for complex vocal learning. A broader rangeof mammals converge in the acoustic structure of vocalizations when insocially interacting groups, which qualifies as limited vocal learning. Allbirds and mammals tested use auditory-vocal feedback to adjust theirvocalizations to compensate for the effects of noise, and many speciesmodulate their signals as the costs and benefits of communicating vary.This chapter asks whether some auditory-vocal feedback may have provided neural substrates for the evolution of vocal learning. Progress willrequire more precise definitions of different forms of vocal learning, broadcomparative review of their presence and absence, and behavioral andneurobiological investigations into the mechanisms underlying the skills.

KW - Auditory-vocal feedback

KW - Compensation for noise

KW - Lombard effect

KW - Vocal convergence

KW - Vocal imitation

KW - Vocal learning

KW - Vocal mimicry

KW - Vocal plasticity

U2 - 10.1007/978-3-319-27721-9

DO - 10.1007/978-3-319-27721-9

M3 - Chapter (peer-reviewed)

SN - 978-3-319-27719-6

VL - 53

T3 - Springer Handbook of Auditory Research

SP - 261

EP - 295

BT - Vertebrate Sound Production and Acoustic Communication

A2 - Suthers, Roderick A.

A2 - Fitch, W. Tecumsah

A2 - Fay, Richard R

A2 - Popper, Arthur N.

PB - Springer

CY - Heidelberg

ER -

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ID: 243606700