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What should I eat? Experimental evidence for prey selection in grey seals

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What should I eat? Experimental evidence for prey selection in grey seals. / Gallon, Susan L.; Thompson, David; Middlemas, Stuart J.

In: Animal Behaviour, Vol. 123, 01.01.2017, p. 35-41.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Gallon, SL, Thompson, D & Middlemas, SJ 2017, 'What should I eat? Experimental evidence for prey selection in grey seals', Animal Behaviour, vol. 123, pp. 35-41. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.anbehav.2016.09.012

APA

Gallon, S. L., Thompson, D., & Middlemas, S. J. (2017). What should I eat? Experimental evidence for prey selection in grey seals. Animal Behaviour, 123, 35-41. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.anbehav.2016.09.012

Vancouver

Gallon SL, Thompson D, Middlemas SJ. What should I eat? Experimental evidence for prey selection in grey seals. Animal Behaviour. 2017 Jan 1;123:35-41. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.anbehav.2016.09.012

Author

Gallon, Susan L. ; Thompson, David ; Middlemas, Stuart J. / What should I eat? Experimental evidence for prey selection in grey seals. In: Animal Behaviour. 2017 ; Vol. 123. pp. 35-41.

Bibtex - Download

@article{ae2be0abd0dc461d95340a6dca61063e,
title = "What should I eat? Experimental evidence for prey selection in grey seals",
abstract = "Understanding the responses of predators, such as seals, to variations in prey availability is key to understanding their role in marine ecosystems. Individual variation in prey preference is likely to be important but we have little information on this aspect of predator behaviour. Operant conditioning techniques and an underwater feeding apparatus were used to test the prey species and size preferences of five captive grey seals, Halichoerus grypus, in a series of paired choice trials. The experimental procedure was designed to present simple foraging choices to remove as many potentially confounding variables as possible. Results suggest that individual grey seals exhibit prey preferences. When presented with different numbers of items of the same species, seals generally selected the larger number of prey items. When presented with choices between two species, seals apparently showed consistent preferences for particular species. However, the apparent species preferences may be simply explained in terms of size selection.",
keywords = "Halichoerus grypus, paired choice, pinniped, prey preference, size selection",
author = "Gallon, {Susan L.} and David Thompson and Middlemas, {Stuart J.}",
note = "This work was funded by a Natural Environmental Research Council studentship with a Fisheries Research Services CASE and a Sea Mammal Research Unit Tim Waters scholarship to Susan Gallon.",
year = "2017",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.anbehav.2016.09.012",
language = "English",
volume = "123",
pages = "35--41",
journal = "Animal Behaviour",
issn = "0003-3472",
publisher = "ACADEMIC PRESS LTD- ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - What should I eat? Experimental evidence for prey selection in grey seals

AU - Gallon, Susan L.

AU - Thompson, David

AU - Middlemas, Stuart J.

N1 - This work was funded by a Natural Environmental Research Council studentship with a Fisheries Research Services CASE and a Sea Mammal Research Unit Tim Waters scholarship to Susan Gallon.

PY - 2017/1/1

Y1 - 2017/1/1

N2 - Understanding the responses of predators, such as seals, to variations in prey availability is key to understanding their role in marine ecosystems. Individual variation in prey preference is likely to be important but we have little information on this aspect of predator behaviour. Operant conditioning techniques and an underwater feeding apparatus were used to test the prey species and size preferences of five captive grey seals, Halichoerus grypus, in a series of paired choice trials. The experimental procedure was designed to present simple foraging choices to remove as many potentially confounding variables as possible. Results suggest that individual grey seals exhibit prey preferences. When presented with different numbers of items of the same species, seals generally selected the larger number of prey items. When presented with choices between two species, seals apparently showed consistent preferences for particular species. However, the apparent species preferences may be simply explained in terms of size selection.

AB - Understanding the responses of predators, such as seals, to variations in prey availability is key to understanding their role in marine ecosystems. Individual variation in prey preference is likely to be important but we have little information on this aspect of predator behaviour. Operant conditioning techniques and an underwater feeding apparatus were used to test the prey species and size preferences of five captive grey seals, Halichoerus grypus, in a series of paired choice trials. The experimental procedure was designed to present simple foraging choices to remove as many potentially confounding variables as possible. Results suggest that individual grey seals exhibit prey preferences. When presented with different numbers of items of the same species, seals generally selected the larger number of prey items. When presented with choices between two species, seals apparently showed consistent preferences for particular species. However, the apparent species preferences may be simply explained in terms of size selection.

KW - Halichoerus grypus

KW - paired choice

KW - pinniped

KW - prey preference

KW - size selection

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84995752488&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.anbehav.2016.09.012

DO - 10.1016/j.anbehav.2016.09.012

M3 - Article

VL - 123

SP - 35

EP - 41

JO - Animal Behaviour

JF - Animal Behaviour

SN - 0003-3472

ER -

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