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Where Culture Takes Hold: "Overimitation" and Its Flexible Deployment in Western, Aboriginal, and Bushmen Children

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DOI

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Where Culture Takes Hold : "Overimitation" and Its Flexible Deployment in Western, Aboriginal, and Bushmen Children. / Nielsen, M.; Mushin, I.; Tomaselli, K.; Whiten, A.

In: Child Development, Vol. 85, No. 6, 01.11.2014, p. 2169-2184.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Nielsen, M, Mushin, I, Tomaselli, K & Whiten, A 2014, 'Where Culture Takes Hold: "Overimitation" and Its Flexible Deployment in Western, Aboriginal, and Bushmen Children' Child Development, vol. 85, no. 6, pp. 2169-2184. https://doi.org/10.1111/cdev.12265

APA

Nielsen, M., Mushin, I., Tomaselli, K., & Whiten, A. (2014). Where Culture Takes Hold: "Overimitation" and Its Flexible Deployment in Western, Aboriginal, and Bushmen Children. Child Development, 85(6), 2169-2184. https://doi.org/10.1111/cdev.12265

Vancouver

Nielsen M, Mushin I, Tomaselli K, Whiten A. Where Culture Takes Hold: "Overimitation" and Its Flexible Deployment in Western, Aboriginal, and Bushmen Children. Child Development. 2014 Nov 1;85(6):2169-2184. https://doi.org/10.1111/cdev.12265

Author

Nielsen, M. ; Mushin, I. ; Tomaselli, K. ; Whiten, A. / Where Culture Takes Hold : "Overimitation" and Its Flexible Deployment in Western, Aboriginal, and Bushmen Children. In: Child Development. 2014 ; Vol. 85, No. 6. pp. 2169-2184.

Bibtex - Download

@article{30c0f6448929445397535173d01d5342,
title = "Where Culture Takes Hold: {"}Overimitation{"} and Its Flexible Deployment in Western, Aboriginal, and Bushmen Children",
abstract = "Children often {"}overimitate,{"} comprehensively copying others' actions despite manifest perceptual cues to their causal ineffectuality. The inflexibility of this behavior renders its adaptive significance difficult to apprehend. This study explored the boundaries of overimitation in 3- to 6-year-old children of three distinct cultures: Westernized, urban Australians (N = 64 in Experiment 1; N = 19 in Experiment 2) and remote communities of South African Bushmen (N = 64) and Australian Aborigines (N = 19). Children overimitated at high frequency in all communities and generalized what they had learned about techniques and object affordances from one object to another. Overimitation thus provides a powerful means of acquiring and flexibly deploying cultural knowledge. The potency of such social learning was also documented compared to opportunities for exploration and practice.",
author = "M. Nielsen and I. Mushin and K. Tomaselli and A. Whiten",
year = "2014",
month = "11",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1111/cdev.12265",
language = "English",
volume = "85",
pages = "2169--2184",
journal = "Child Development",
issn = "0009-3920",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "6",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Where Culture Takes Hold

T2 - Child Development

AU - Nielsen, M.

AU - Mushin, I.

AU - Tomaselli, K.

AU - Whiten, A.

PY - 2014/11/1

Y1 - 2014/11/1

N2 - Children often "overimitate," comprehensively copying others' actions despite manifest perceptual cues to their causal ineffectuality. The inflexibility of this behavior renders its adaptive significance difficult to apprehend. This study explored the boundaries of overimitation in 3- to 6-year-old children of three distinct cultures: Westernized, urban Australians (N = 64 in Experiment 1; N = 19 in Experiment 2) and remote communities of South African Bushmen (N = 64) and Australian Aborigines (N = 19). Children overimitated at high frequency in all communities and generalized what they had learned about techniques and object affordances from one object to another. Overimitation thus provides a powerful means of acquiring and flexibly deploying cultural knowledge. The potency of such social learning was also documented compared to opportunities for exploration and practice.

AB - Children often "overimitate," comprehensively copying others' actions despite manifest perceptual cues to their causal ineffectuality. The inflexibility of this behavior renders its adaptive significance difficult to apprehend. This study explored the boundaries of overimitation in 3- to 6-year-old children of three distinct cultures: Westernized, urban Australians (N = 64 in Experiment 1; N = 19 in Experiment 2) and remote communities of South African Bushmen (N = 64) and Australian Aborigines (N = 19). Children overimitated at high frequency in all communities and generalized what they had learned about techniques and object affordances from one object to another. Overimitation thus provides a powerful means of acquiring and flexibly deploying cultural knowledge. The potency of such social learning was also documented compared to opportunities for exploration and practice.

U2 - 10.1111/cdev.12265

DO - 10.1111/cdev.12265

M3 - Article

VL - 85

SP - 2169

EP - 2184

JO - Child Development

JF - Child Development

SN - 0009-3920

IS - 6

ER -

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ID: 159773130