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Wild vervet monkeys copy alternative methods for opening an artificial fruit

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Wild vervet monkeys copy alternative methods for opening an artificial fruit. / van de Waal, Erica; Claidiere, Nicolas; Whiten, Andrew.

In: Animal Cognition, Vol. 18, No. 3, 05.2015, p. 617-627.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

van de Waal, E, Claidiere, N & Whiten, A 2015, 'Wild vervet monkeys copy alternative methods for opening an artificial fruit' Animal Cognition, vol. 18, no. 3, pp. 617-627. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10071-014-0830-4

APA

van de Waal, E., Claidiere, N., & Whiten, A. (2015). Wild vervet monkeys copy alternative methods for opening an artificial fruit. Animal Cognition, 18(3), 617-627. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10071-014-0830-4

Vancouver

van de Waal E, Claidiere N, Whiten A. Wild vervet monkeys copy alternative methods for opening an artificial fruit. Animal Cognition. 2015 May;18(3):617-627. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10071-014-0830-4

Author

van de Waal, Erica ; Claidiere, Nicolas ; Whiten, Andrew. / Wild vervet monkeys copy alternative methods for opening an artificial fruit. In: Animal Cognition. 2015 ; Vol. 18, No. 3. pp. 617-627.

Bibtex - Download

@article{739b42b6475947c788ef7abbb97607c4,
title = "Wild vervet monkeys copy alternative methods for opening an artificial fruit",
abstract = "Experimental studies of animal social learning in the wild remain rare, especially those that employ the most discriminating tests in which alternative means to complete naturalistic tasks are seeded in different groups. We applied this approach to wild vervet monkeys (Chlorocebus aethiops) using an artificial fruit (‘vervetable’) opened by either lifting a door panel or sliding it left or right. In one group, a trained model lifted the door, and in two others, the model slid it either left or right. Members of each group then watched their model before being given access to multiple baited vervetables with all opening techniques possible. Thirteen of these monkeys opened vervetables, displaying a significant tendency to use the seeded technique on their first opening and over the course of the experiment. The option preferred in these monkeys’ first successful manipulation session was also highly correlated with the proportional frequency of the option they had previously witnessed. The social learning effects thus documented go beyond mere stimulus enhancement insofar as the same door knob was grasped for either technique. Results thus suggest that through imitation, emulation or both, new foraging techniques will spread across groups of wild vervet monkeys to create incipient foraging traditions.",
keywords = "Field experiments, Social learning, Imitation, Cultural transmission, Primates, Vervet monkeys",
author = "{van de Waal}, Erica and Nicolas Claidiere and Andrew Whiten",
note = "This project was supported by a Sinergia grant (CRSI33_133040) from the Swiss National Science Foundation to R. Bshary, C. P. van Schaik and A. Whiten, and by a SNSF personal grant of E.W. (P300P3_151187).",
year = "2015",
month = "5",
doi = "10.1007/s10071-014-0830-4",
language = "English",
volume = "18",
pages = "617--627",
journal = "Animal Cognition",
issn = "1435-9448",
publisher = "Springer",
number = "3",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Wild vervet monkeys copy alternative methods for opening an artificial fruit

AU - van de Waal, Erica

AU - Claidiere, Nicolas

AU - Whiten, Andrew

N1 - This project was supported by a Sinergia grant (CRSI33_133040) from the Swiss National Science Foundation to R. Bshary, C. P. van Schaik and A. Whiten, and by a SNSF personal grant of E.W. (P300P3_151187).

PY - 2015/5

Y1 - 2015/5

N2 - Experimental studies of animal social learning in the wild remain rare, especially those that employ the most discriminating tests in which alternative means to complete naturalistic tasks are seeded in different groups. We applied this approach to wild vervet monkeys (Chlorocebus aethiops) using an artificial fruit (‘vervetable’) opened by either lifting a door panel or sliding it left or right. In one group, a trained model lifted the door, and in two others, the model slid it either left or right. Members of each group then watched their model before being given access to multiple baited vervetables with all opening techniques possible. Thirteen of these monkeys opened vervetables, displaying a significant tendency to use the seeded technique on their first opening and over the course of the experiment. The option preferred in these monkeys’ first successful manipulation session was also highly correlated with the proportional frequency of the option they had previously witnessed. The social learning effects thus documented go beyond mere stimulus enhancement insofar as the same door knob was grasped for either technique. Results thus suggest that through imitation, emulation or both, new foraging techniques will spread across groups of wild vervet monkeys to create incipient foraging traditions.

AB - Experimental studies of animal social learning in the wild remain rare, especially those that employ the most discriminating tests in which alternative means to complete naturalistic tasks are seeded in different groups. We applied this approach to wild vervet monkeys (Chlorocebus aethiops) using an artificial fruit (‘vervetable’) opened by either lifting a door panel or sliding it left or right. In one group, a trained model lifted the door, and in two others, the model slid it either left or right. Members of each group then watched their model before being given access to multiple baited vervetables with all opening techniques possible. Thirteen of these monkeys opened vervetables, displaying a significant tendency to use the seeded technique on their first opening and over the course of the experiment. The option preferred in these monkeys’ first successful manipulation session was also highly correlated with the proportional frequency of the option they had previously witnessed. The social learning effects thus documented go beyond mere stimulus enhancement insofar as the same door knob was grasped for either technique. Results thus suggest that through imitation, emulation or both, new foraging techniques will spread across groups of wild vervet monkeys to create incipient foraging traditions.

KW - Field experiments

KW - Social learning

KW - Imitation

KW - Cultural transmission

KW - Primates

KW - Vervet monkeys

U2 - 10.1007/s10071-014-0830-4

DO - 10.1007/s10071-014-0830-4

M3 - Article

VL - 18

SP - 617

EP - 627

JO - Animal Cognition

T2 - Animal Cognition

JF - Animal Cognition

SN - 1435-9448

IS - 3

ER -

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ID: 161865875