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Wind turbine underwater noise and marine mammals: implications of current knowledge and data needs

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Wind turbine underwater noise and marine mammals : implications of current knowledge and data needs. / Madsen, P T ; Wahlberg, M ; Tougaard, J ; Lucke, K ; Tyack, Peter Lloyd.

In: Marine Ecology Progress Series, Vol. 309, 2006, p. 279-295.

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Madsen, PT, Wahlberg, M, Tougaard, J, Lucke, K & Tyack, PL 2006, 'Wind turbine underwater noise and marine mammals: implications of current knowledge and data needs' Marine Ecology Progress Series, vol. 309, pp. 279-295. https://doi.org/10.3354/meps309279

APA

Madsen, P. T., Wahlberg, M., Tougaard, J., Lucke, K., & Tyack, P. L. (2006). Wind turbine underwater noise and marine mammals: implications of current knowledge and data needs. Marine Ecology Progress Series, 309, 279-295. https://doi.org/10.3354/meps309279

Vancouver

Madsen PT, Wahlberg M, Tougaard J, Lucke K, Tyack PL. Wind turbine underwater noise and marine mammals: implications of current knowledge and data needs. Marine Ecology Progress Series. 2006;309:279-295. https://doi.org/10.3354/meps309279

Author

Madsen, P T ; Wahlberg, M ; Tougaard, J ; Lucke, K ; Tyack, Peter Lloyd. / Wind turbine underwater noise and marine mammals : implications of current knowledge and data needs. In: Marine Ecology Progress Series. 2006 ; Vol. 309. pp. 279-295.

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@article{9c6ceeef9862476e97218eb62b4332c1,
title = "Wind turbine underwater noise and marine mammals: implications of current knowledge and data needs",
abstract = "The demand for renewable energy has led to construction of offshore wind farms with high-power turbines, and many more wind farms are being planned for the shallow waters of the world's marine habitats. The growth of offshore wind farms has raised concerns about their impact on the marine environment. Marine mammals use sound for foraging, orientation and communication and are therefore possibly susceptible to negative effects of man-made noise generated from constructing and operating large offshore wind turbines. This paper reviews the existing literature and assesses zones of impact from different noise-generating activities in conjunction with wind farms on 4 representative shallow-water species of marine mammals. Construction involves many types of activities that can generate high sound pressure levels, and pile-driving seems to be the noisiest of all. Both the literature and modeling show that pile-driving and other activities that generate intense impulses during construction are likely to disrupt the behavior of marine mammals at ranges of many kilometers, and that these activities have the potential to induce hearing impairment at close range. The reported noise levels from operating wind turbines are low, and are unlikely to impair hearing in marine mammals. The impact zones for marine mammals from operating wind turbines depend on the low-frequency hearing-abilities of the species in question, on sound-propagation conditions, and on the presence of other noise sources such as shipping. The noise impact on marine mammals is more severe during the construction of wind farms than during their operation.",
keywords = "Marine mammal, Wind turbine, Pile-driving, Underwater noise, Impact zones, Masking",
author = "Madsen, {P T} and M Wahlberg and J Tougaard and K Lucke and Tyack, {Peter Lloyd}",
year = "2006",
doi = "10.3354/meps309279",
language = "English",
volume = "309",
pages = "279--295",
journal = "Marine Ecology Progress Series",
issn = "0171-8630",
publisher = "Inter-Research",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Wind turbine underwater noise and marine mammals

T2 - Marine Ecology Progress Series

AU - Madsen, P T

AU - Wahlberg, M

AU - Tougaard, J

AU - Lucke, K

AU - Tyack, Peter Lloyd

PY - 2006

Y1 - 2006

N2 - The demand for renewable energy has led to construction of offshore wind farms with high-power turbines, and many more wind farms are being planned for the shallow waters of the world's marine habitats. The growth of offshore wind farms has raised concerns about their impact on the marine environment. Marine mammals use sound for foraging, orientation and communication and are therefore possibly susceptible to negative effects of man-made noise generated from constructing and operating large offshore wind turbines. This paper reviews the existing literature and assesses zones of impact from different noise-generating activities in conjunction with wind farms on 4 representative shallow-water species of marine mammals. Construction involves many types of activities that can generate high sound pressure levels, and pile-driving seems to be the noisiest of all. Both the literature and modeling show that pile-driving and other activities that generate intense impulses during construction are likely to disrupt the behavior of marine mammals at ranges of many kilometers, and that these activities have the potential to induce hearing impairment at close range. The reported noise levels from operating wind turbines are low, and are unlikely to impair hearing in marine mammals. The impact zones for marine mammals from operating wind turbines depend on the low-frequency hearing-abilities of the species in question, on sound-propagation conditions, and on the presence of other noise sources such as shipping. The noise impact on marine mammals is more severe during the construction of wind farms than during their operation.

AB - The demand for renewable energy has led to construction of offshore wind farms with high-power turbines, and many more wind farms are being planned for the shallow waters of the world's marine habitats. The growth of offshore wind farms has raised concerns about their impact on the marine environment. Marine mammals use sound for foraging, orientation and communication and are therefore possibly susceptible to negative effects of man-made noise generated from constructing and operating large offshore wind turbines. This paper reviews the existing literature and assesses zones of impact from different noise-generating activities in conjunction with wind farms on 4 representative shallow-water species of marine mammals. Construction involves many types of activities that can generate high sound pressure levels, and pile-driving seems to be the noisiest of all. Both the literature and modeling show that pile-driving and other activities that generate intense impulses during construction are likely to disrupt the behavior of marine mammals at ranges of many kilometers, and that these activities have the potential to induce hearing impairment at close range. The reported noise levels from operating wind turbines are low, and are unlikely to impair hearing in marine mammals. The impact zones for marine mammals from operating wind turbines depend on the low-frequency hearing-abilities of the species in question, on sound-propagation conditions, and on the presence of other noise sources such as shipping. The noise impact on marine mammals is more severe during the construction of wind farms than during their operation.

KW - Marine mammal

KW - Wind turbine

KW - Pile-driving

KW - Underwater noise

KW - Impact zones

KW - Masking

U2 - 10.3354/meps309279

DO - 10.3354/meps309279

M3 - Review article

VL - 309

SP - 279

EP - 295

JO - Marine Ecology Progress Series

JF - Marine Ecology Progress Series

SN - 0171-8630

ER -

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