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Writing Scottish Parliamentary history, c.1500 – 1707

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Writing Scottish Parliamentary history, c.1500 – 1707. / Blakeway, Amy Louise; Stewart, Laura.

In: Parliamentary History, Vol. 40, No. 1, 02.2021, p. 93-112.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Harvard

Blakeway, AL & Stewart, L 2021, 'Writing Scottish Parliamentary history, c.1500 – 1707', Parliamentary History, vol. 40, no. 1, pp. 93-112. https://doi.org/10.1111/1750-0206.12545

APA

Blakeway, A. L., & Stewart, L. (2021). Writing Scottish Parliamentary history, c.1500 – 1707. Parliamentary History, 40(1), 93-112. https://doi.org/10.1111/1750-0206.12545

Vancouver

Blakeway AL, Stewart L. Writing Scottish Parliamentary history, c.1500 – 1707. Parliamentary History. 2021 Feb;40(1):93-112. https://doi.org/10.1111/1750-0206.12545

Author

Blakeway, Amy Louise ; Stewart, Laura. / Writing Scottish Parliamentary history, c.1500 – 1707. In: Parliamentary History. 2021 ; Vol. 40, No. 1. pp. 93-112.

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@article{5fff0fd2ea004726acb5e25b6791bd90,
title = "Writing Scottish Parliamentary history, c.1500 – 1707",
abstract = "In the 19th and 20th centuries, scholarship on the Scottish parliament was heavily informed by a narrative of {\textquoteleft}failure{\textquoteright}, directed at explaining why its members voted it out of existence in 1707. Part of the problem was the tendency to see any deviation from the practices of the Westminster parliament as weakness. By reappraising parliament in terms of its utility to those who comprised its membership, notably the titled peerage and the monarch, historians have revealed its adaptability and inventiveness, especially in times of crisis. This essay considers how fresh approaches both to what constituted the parliamentary record and what can – and cannot – be found within it have exerted a transformative influence on our understanding of parliament's evolving role in Scottish political life. Although the Reformation crisis of 1560 and the accession of the ruling house of Stewart to the English throne in 1603 effected profound changes on parliamentary culture, this essay emphasises how parliament sustained its legitimacy and relevance, in part, by drawing on past practices and ideas. Historians have become more attentive in recent years to the means by which social groupings ordinarily excluded from formal parliamentary activity were nonetheless able to engage with, and influence, its proceedings. Gaps remain in our knowledge, however. Some periods have been more intensively studied than others, while certain aspects of parliamentary culture are understudied. The writing of Scottish parliamentary history will continue to offer rich possibilities in future.",
keywords = "Covenanters, Cromwellian occupation, Kingship, Parties, Print, Reformation, Restoration, Revolution, Scotland, Speeches",
author = "Blakeway, {Amy Louise} and Laura Stewart",
year = "2021",
month = feb,
doi = "10.1111/1750-0206.12545",
language = "English",
volume = "40",
pages = "93--112",
journal = "Parliamentary History",
issn = "0264-2824",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "1",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Writing Scottish Parliamentary history, c.1500 – 1707

AU - Blakeway, Amy Louise

AU - Stewart, Laura

PY - 2021/2

Y1 - 2021/2

N2 - In the 19th and 20th centuries, scholarship on the Scottish parliament was heavily informed by a narrative of ‘failure’, directed at explaining why its members voted it out of existence in 1707. Part of the problem was the tendency to see any deviation from the practices of the Westminster parliament as weakness. By reappraising parliament in terms of its utility to those who comprised its membership, notably the titled peerage and the monarch, historians have revealed its adaptability and inventiveness, especially in times of crisis. This essay considers how fresh approaches both to what constituted the parliamentary record and what can – and cannot – be found within it have exerted a transformative influence on our understanding of parliament's evolving role in Scottish political life. Although the Reformation crisis of 1560 and the accession of the ruling house of Stewart to the English throne in 1603 effected profound changes on parliamentary culture, this essay emphasises how parliament sustained its legitimacy and relevance, in part, by drawing on past practices and ideas. Historians have become more attentive in recent years to the means by which social groupings ordinarily excluded from formal parliamentary activity were nonetheless able to engage with, and influence, its proceedings. Gaps remain in our knowledge, however. Some periods have been more intensively studied than others, while certain aspects of parliamentary culture are understudied. The writing of Scottish parliamentary history will continue to offer rich possibilities in future.

AB - In the 19th and 20th centuries, scholarship on the Scottish parliament was heavily informed by a narrative of ‘failure’, directed at explaining why its members voted it out of existence in 1707. Part of the problem was the tendency to see any deviation from the practices of the Westminster parliament as weakness. By reappraising parliament in terms of its utility to those who comprised its membership, notably the titled peerage and the monarch, historians have revealed its adaptability and inventiveness, especially in times of crisis. This essay considers how fresh approaches both to what constituted the parliamentary record and what can – and cannot – be found within it have exerted a transformative influence on our understanding of parliament's evolving role in Scottish political life. Although the Reformation crisis of 1560 and the accession of the ruling house of Stewart to the English throne in 1603 effected profound changes on parliamentary culture, this essay emphasises how parliament sustained its legitimacy and relevance, in part, by drawing on past practices and ideas. Historians have become more attentive in recent years to the means by which social groupings ordinarily excluded from formal parliamentary activity were nonetheless able to engage with, and influence, its proceedings. Gaps remain in our knowledge, however. Some periods have been more intensively studied than others, while certain aspects of parliamentary culture are understudied. The writing of Scottish parliamentary history will continue to offer rich possibilities in future.

KW - Covenanters

KW - Cromwellian occupation

KW - Kingship

KW - Parties

KW - Print

KW - Reformation

KW - Restoration

KW - Revolution

KW - Scotland

KW - Speeches

U2 - 10.1111/1750-0206.12545

DO - 10.1111/1750-0206.12545

M3 - Article

VL - 40

SP - 93

EP - 112

JO - Parliamentary History

JF - Parliamentary History

SN - 0264-2824

IS - 1

ER -

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ID: 270419275

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