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You are what you eat: Within-subject increases in fruit and vegetable consumption confer beneficial skin-color changes

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You are what you eat : Within-subject increases in fruit and vegetable consumption confer beneficial skin-color changes. / Whitehead, Ross David; Re, Daniel; Xiao, Dengke; Ozakinci, Gozde; Perrett, David Ian.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 7, No. 3, e32988, 07.03.2012.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Whitehead, RD, Re, D, Xiao, D, Ozakinci, G & Perrett, DI 2012, 'You are what you eat: Within-subject increases in fruit and vegetable consumption confer beneficial skin-color changes' PLoS One, vol 7, no. 3, e32988. DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0032988

APA

Whitehead, R. D., Re, D., Xiao, D., Ozakinci, G., & Perrett, D. I. (2012). You are what you eat: Within-subject increases in fruit and vegetable consumption confer beneficial skin-color changes. PLoS One, 7(3), [e32988]. DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0032988

Vancouver

Whitehead RD, Re D, Xiao D, Ozakinci G, Perrett DI. You are what you eat: Within-subject increases in fruit and vegetable consumption confer beneficial skin-color changes. PLoS One. 2012 Mar 7;7(3). e32988. Available from, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0032988

Author

Whitehead, Ross David; Re, Daniel; Xiao, Dengke; Ozakinci, Gozde; Perrett, David Ian / You are what you eat : Within-subject increases in fruit and vegetable consumption confer beneficial skin-color changes.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 7, No. 3, e32988, 07.03.2012.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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@article{104c06f7553b4e968069e99e4c579693,
title = "You are what you eat: Within-subject increases in fruit and vegetable consumption confer beneficial skin-color changes",
abstract = "Background: Fruit and vegetable consumption and ingestion of carotenoids have been found to be associated with human skin-color (yellowness) in a recent cross-sectional study. This carotenoid-based coloration contributes beneficially to the appearance of health in humans and is held to be a sexually selected cue of condition in other species. Methodology and Principal Findings: Here we investigate the effects of fruit and vegetable consumption on skin-color longitudinally to determine the magnitude and duration of diet change required to change skin-color perceptibly. Diet and skin-color were recorded at baseline and after three and six weeks, in a group of 35 individuals who were without makeup, self-tanning agents and/or recent intensive UV exposure. Six-week changes in fruit and vegetable consumption were significantly correlated with changes in skin redness and yellowness over this period, and diet-linked skin reflectance changes were significantly associated with the spectral absorption of carotenoids and not melanin. We also used psychophysical methods to investigate the minimum color change required to confer perceptibly healthier and more attractive skin-coloration. Modest dietary changes are required to enhance apparent health (2.91 portions per day) and attractiveness (3.30 portions). Conclusions: Increased fruit and vegetable consumption confers measurable and perceptibly beneficial effects on Caucasian skin appearance within six weeks. This effect could potentially be used as a motivational tool in dietary intervention.",
author = "Whitehead, {Ross David} and Daniel Re and Dengke Xiao and Gozde Ozakinci and Perrett, {David Ian}",
note = "R Whitehead was funded by an ESRC Studentship.",
year = "2012",
month = "3",
doi = "10.1371/journal.pone.0032988",
volume = "7",
journal = "PLoS One",
issn = "1932-6203",
publisher = "Public Library of Science",
number = "3",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - You are what you eat

T2 - PLoS One

AU - Whitehead,Ross David

AU - Re,Daniel

AU - Xiao,Dengke

AU - Ozakinci,Gozde

AU - Perrett,David Ian

N1 - R Whitehead was funded by an ESRC Studentship.

PY - 2012/3/7

Y1 - 2012/3/7

N2 - Background: Fruit and vegetable consumption and ingestion of carotenoids have been found to be associated with human skin-color (yellowness) in a recent cross-sectional study. This carotenoid-based coloration contributes beneficially to the appearance of health in humans and is held to be a sexually selected cue of condition in other species. Methodology and Principal Findings: Here we investigate the effects of fruit and vegetable consumption on skin-color longitudinally to determine the magnitude and duration of diet change required to change skin-color perceptibly. Diet and skin-color were recorded at baseline and after three and six weeks, in a group of 35 individuals who were without makeup, self-tanning agents and/or recent intensive UV exposure. Six-week changes in fruit and vegetable consumption were significantly correlated with changes in skin redness and yellowness over this period, and diet-linked skin reflectance changes were significantly associated with the spectral absorption of carotenoids and not melanin. We also used psychophysical methods to investigate the minimum color change required to confer perceptibly healthier and more attractive skin-coloration. Modest dietary changes are required to enhance apparent health (2.91 portions per day) and attractiveness (3.30 portions). Conclusions: Increased fruit and vegetable consumption confers measurable and perceptibly beneficial effects on Caucasian skin appearance within six weeks. This effect could potentially be used as a motivational tool in dietary intervention.

AB - Background: Fruit and vegetable consumption and ingestion of carotenoids have been found to be associated with human skin-color (yellowness) in a recent cross-sectional study. This carotenoid-based coloration contributes beneficially to the appearance of health in humans and is held to be a sexually selected cue of condition in other species. Methodology and Principal Findings: Here we investigate the effects of fruit and vegetable consumption on skin-color longitudinally to determine the magnitude and duration of diet change required to change skin-color perceptibly. Diet and skin-color were recorded at baseline and after three and six weeks, in a group of 35 individuals who were without makeup, self-tanning agents and/or recent intensive UV exposure. Six-week changes in fruit and vegetable consumption were significantly correlated with changes in skin redness and yellowness over this period, and diet-linked skin reflectance changes were significantly associated with the spectral absorption of carotenoids and not melanin. We also used psychophysical methods to investigate the minimum color change required to confer perceptibly healthier and more attractive skin-coloration. Modest dietary changes are required to enhance apparent health (2.91 portions per day) and attractiveness (3.30 portions). Conclusions: Increased fruit and vegetable consumption confers measurable and perceptibly beneficial effects on Caucasian skin appearance within six weeks. This effect could potentially be used as a motivational tool in dietary intervention.

UR - http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0032988

U2 - 10.1371/journal.pone.0032988

DO - 10.1371/journal.pone.0032988

M3 - Article

VL - 7

JO - PLoS One

JF - PLoS One

SN - 1932-6203

IS - 3

M1 - e32988

ER -

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ID: 16837906