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Young Children Selectively Avoid Helping People With Harmful Intentions

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Young Children Selectively Avoid Helping People With Harmful Intentions. / Vaish, Amrisha; Carpenter, Malinda; Tomasello, Michael.

In: Child Development, Vol. 81, No. 6, 2010, p. 1661-1669.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Harvard

Vaish, A, Carpenter, M & Tomasello, M 2010, 'Young Children Selectively Avoid Helping People With Harmful Intentions', Child Development, vol. 81, no. 6, pp. 1661-1669. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-8624.2010.01500.x

APA

Vaish, A., Carpenter, M., & Tomasello, M. (2010). Young Children Selectively Avoid Helping People With Harmful Intentions. Child Development, 81(6), 1661-1669. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-8624.2010.01500.x

Vancouver

Vaish A, Carpenter M, Tomasello M. Young Children Selectively Avoid Helping People With Harmful Intentions. Child Development. 2010;81(6):1661-1669. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-8624.2010.01500.x

Author

Vaish, Amrisha ; Carpenter, Malinda ; Tomasello, Michael. / Young Children Selectively Avoid Helping People With Harmful Intentions. In: Child Development. 2010 ; Vol. 81, No. 6. pp. 1661-1669.

Bibtex - Download

@article{5c612a8b9a564527b0716f8c4b6300d0,
title = "Young Children Selectively Avoid Helping People With Harmful Intentions",
abstract = "Two studies investigated whether young children are selectively prosocial toward others, based on the others' moral behaviors. In Study 1 (N = 54), 3-year-olds watched 1 adult (the actor) harming or helping another adult. Children subsequently helped the harmful actor less often than a third (previously neutral) adult, but helped the helpful and neutral adults equally often. In Study 2 (N = 36), 3-year-olds helped an actor who intended but failed to harm another adult less often than a neutral adult, but helped an accidentally harmful and a neutral adult equally often. Children's prosocial behavior was thus mediated by the intentions behind the actor's moral behavior, irrespective of outcome. Children thus selectively avoid helping those who cause-or even intend to cause-others harm.",
keywords = "PROSOCIAL BEHAVIOR, MORAL JUDGMENT, HUMAN ALTRUISM, PUNISHMENT, TRANSGRESSIONS, COOPERATION, RESPONSES, INFANTS, OTHERS",
author = "Amrisha Vaish and Malinda Carpenter and Michael Tomasello",
year = "2010",
doi = "10.1111/j.1467-8624.2010.01500.x",
language = "English",
volume = "81",
pages = "1661--1669",
journal = "Child Development",
issn = "0009-3920",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "6",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Young Children Selectively Avoid Helping People With Harmful Intentions

AU - Vaish, Amrisha

AU - Carpenter, Malinda

AU - Tomasello, Michael

PY - 2010

Y1 - 2010

N2 - Two studies investigated whether young children are selectively prosocial toward others, based on the others' moral behaviors. In Study 1 (N = 54), 3-year-olds watched 1 adult (the actor) harming or helping another adult. Children subsequently helped the harmful actor less often than a third (previously neutral) adult, but helped the helpful and neutral adults equally often. In Study 2 (N = 36), 3-year-olds helped an actor who intended but failed to harm another adult less often than a neutral adult, but helped an accidentally harmful and a neutral adult equally often. Children's prosocial behavior was thus mediated by the intentions behind the actor's moral behavior, irrespective of outcome. Children thus selectively avoid helping those who cause-or even intend to cause-others harm.

AB - Two studies investigated whether young children are selectively prosocial toward others, based on the others' moral behaviors. In Study 1 (N = 54), 3-year-olds watched 1 adult (the actor) harming or helping another adult. Children subsequently helped the harmful actor less often than a third (previously neutral) adult, but helped the helpful and neutral adults equally often. In Study 2 (N = 36), 3-year-olds helped an actor who intended but failed to harm another adult less often than a neutral adult, but helped an accidentally harmful and a neutral adult equally often. Children's prosocial behavior was thus mediated by the intentions behind the actor's moral behavior, irrespective of outcome. Children thus selectively avoid helping those who cause-or even intend to cause-others harm.

KW - PROSOCIAL BEHAVIOR

KW - MORAL JUDGMENT

KW - HUMAN ALTRUISM

KW - PUNISHMENT

KW - TRANSGRESSIONS

KW - COOPERATION

KW - RESPONSES

KW - INFANTS

KW - OTHERS

U2 - 10.1111/j.1467-8624.2010.01500.x

DO - 10.1111/j.1467-8624.2010.01500.x

M3 - Article

VL - 81

SP - 1661

EP - 1669

JO - Child Development

JF - Child Development

SN - 0009-3920

IS - 6

ER -

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